Direktori : /home/redrockmedical/public_html/
Upload File :
Current File : /home/redrockmedical/public_html/wp-login.php

<?php
/**
 * WordPress User Page
 *
 * Handles authentication, registering, resetting passwords, forgot password,
 * and other user handling.
 *
 * @package WordPress
 */

/** Make sure that the WordPress bootstrap has run before continuing. */
require( dirname(__FILE__) . '/wp-load.php' );

// Redirect to https login if forced to use SSL
if ( force_ssl_admin() && ! is_ssl() ) {
	if ( 0 === strpos($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'], 'http') ) {
		wp_safe_redirect( set_url_scheme( $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'], 'https' ) );
		exit();
	} else {
		wp_safe_redirect( 'https://' . $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] );
		exit();
	}
}

/**
 * Output the login page header.
 *
 * @param string   $title    Optional. WordPress login Page title to display in the `<title>` element.
 *                           Default 'Log In'.
 * @param string   $message  Optional. Message to display in header. Default empty.
 * @param WP_Error $wp_error Optional. The error to pass. Default is a WP_Error instance.
 */
function login_header( $title = 'Log In', $message = '', $wp_error = null ) {
	global $error, $interim_login, $action;

	// Don't index any of these forms
	add_action( 'login_head', 'wp_no_robots' );

	add_action( 'login_head', 'wp_login_viewport_meta' );

	if ( ! is_wp_error( $wp_error ) ) {
		$wp_error = new WP_Error();
	}

	// Shake it!
	$shake_error_codes = array( 'empty_password', 'empty_email', 'invalid_email', 'invalidcombo', 'empty_username', 'invalid_username', 'incorrect_password' );
	/**
	 * Filters the error codes array for shaking the login form.
	 *
	 * @since 3.0.0
	 *
	 * @param array $shake_error_codes Error codes that shake the login form.
	 */
	$shake_error_codes = apply_filters( 'shake_error_codes', $shake_error_codes );

	if ( $shake_error_codes && $wp_error->get_error_code() && in_array( $wp_error->get_error_code(), $shake_error_codes ) )
		add_action( 'login_head', 'wp_shake_js', 12 );

	$login_title = get_bloginfo( 'name', 'display' );

	/* translators: Login screen title. 1: Login screen name, 2: Network or site name */
	$login_title = sprintf( __( '%1$s &lsaquo; %2$s &#8212; WordPress' ), $title, $login_title );

	/**
	 * Filters the title tag content for login page.
	 *
	 * @since 4.9.0
	 *
	 * @param string $login_title The page title, with extra context added.
	 * @param string $title       The original page title.
	 */
	$login_title = apply_filters( 'login_title', $login_title, $title );

	?><!DOCTYPE html>
	<!--[if IE 8]>
		<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" class="ie8" <?php language_attributes(); ?>>
	<![endif]-->
	<!--[if !(IE 8) ]><!-->
		<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" <?php language_attributes(); ?>>
	<!--<![endif]-->
	<head>
	<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="<?php bloginfo('html_type'); ?>; charset=<?php bloginfo('charset'); ?>" />
	<title><?php echo $login_title; ?></title>
	<?php

	wp_enqueue_style( 'login' );

	/*
	 * Remove all stored post data on logging out.
	 * This could be added by add_action('login_head'...) like wp_shake_js(),
	 * but maybe better if it's not removable by plugins
	 */
	if ( 'loggedout' == $wp_error->get_error_code() ) {
		?>
		<script>if("sessionStorage" in window){try{for(var key in sessionStorage){if(key.indexOf("wp-autosave-")!=-1){sessionStorage.removeItem(key)}}}catch(e){}};</script>
		<?php
	}

	/**
	 * Enqueue scripts and styles for the login page.
	 *
	 * @since 3.1.0
	 */
	do_action( 'login_enqueue_scripts' );

	/**
	 * Fires in the login page header after scripts are enqueued.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 */
	do_action( 'login_head' );

	if ( is_multisite() ) {
		$login_header_url   = network_home_url();
		$login_header_title = get_network()->site_name;
	} else {
		$login_header_url   = __( 'https://wordpress.org/' );
		$login_header_title = __( 'Powered by WordPress' );
	}

	/**
	 * Filters link URL of the header logo above login form.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 *
	 * @param string $login_header_url Login header logo URL.
	 */
	$login_header_url = apply_filters( 'login_headerurl', $login_header_url );

	/**
	 * Filters the title attribute of the header logo above login form.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 *
	 * @param string $login_header_title Login header logo title attribute.
	 */
	$login_header_title = apply_filters( 'login_headertitle', $login_header_title );

	/*
	 * To match the URL/title set above, Multisite sites have the blog name,
	 * while single sites get the header title.
	 */
	if ( is_multisite() ) {
		$login_header_text = get_bloginfo( 'name', 'display' );
	} else {
		$login_header_text = $login_header_title;
	}

	$classes = array( 'login-action-' . $action, 'wp-core-ui' );
	if ( is_rtl() )
		$classes[] = 'rtl';
	if ( $interim_login ) {
		$classes[] = 'interim-login';
		?>
		<style type="text/css">html{background-color: transparent;}</style>
		<?php

		if ( 'success' ===  $interim_login )
			$classes[] = 'interim-login-success';
	}
	$classes[] =' locale-' . sanitize_html_class( strtolower( str_replace( '_', '-', get_locale() ) ) );

	/**
	 * Filters the login page body classes.
	 *
	 * @since 3.5.0
	 *
	 * @param array  $classes An array of body classes.
	 * @param string $action  The action that brought the visitor to the login page.
	 */
	$classes = apply_filters( 'login_body_class', $classes, $action );

	?>
	</head>
	<body class="login <?php echo esc_attr( implode( ' ', $classes ) ); ?>">
	<?php
	/**
	 * Fires in the login page header after the body tag is opened.
	 *
	 * @since 4.6.0
	 */
	do_action( 'login_header' );
	?>
	<div id="login">
		<h1><a href="<?php echo esc_url( $login_header_url ); ?>" title="<?php echo esc_attr( $login_header_title ); ?>" tabindex="-1"><?php echo $login_header_text; ?></a></h1>
	<?php

	unset( $login_header_url, $login_header_title );

	/**
	 * Filters the message to display above the login form.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 *
	 * @param string $message Login message text.
	 */
	$message = apply_filters( 'login_message', $message );
	if ( !empty( $message ) )
		echo $message . "\n";

	// In case a plugin uses $error rather than the $wp_errors object
	if ( !empty( $error ) ) {
		$wp_error->add('error', $error);
		unset($error);
	}

	if ( $wp_error->get_error_code() ) {
		$errors = '';
		$messages = '';
		foreach ( $wp_error->get_error_codes() as $code ) {
			$severity = $wp_error->get_error_data( $code );
			foreach ( $wp_error->get_error_messages( $code ) as $error_message ) {
				if ( 'message' == $severity )
					$messages .= '	' . $error_message . "<br />\n";
				else
					$errors .= '	' . $error_message . "<br />\n";
			}
		}
		if ( ! empty( $errors ) ) {
			/**
			 * Filters the error messages displayed above the login form.
			 *
			 * @since 2.1.0
			 *
			 * @param string $errors Login error message.
			 */
			echo '<div id="login_error">' . apply_filters( 'login_errors', $errors ) . "</div>\n";
		}
		if ( ! empty( $messages ) ) {
			/**
			 * Filters instructional messages displayed above the login form.
			 *
			 * @since 2.5.0
			 *
			 * @param string $messages Login messages.
			 */
			echo '<p class="message">' . apply_filters( 'login_messages', $messages ) . "</p>\n";
		}
	}
} // End of login_header()

/**
 * Outputs the footer for the login page.
 *
 * @param string $input_id Which input to auto-focus
 */
function login_footer($input_id = '') {
	global $interim_login;

	// Don't allow interim logins to navigate away from the page.
	if ( ! $interim_login ): ?>
	<p id="backtoblog"><a href="<?php echo esc_url( home_url( '/' ) ); ?>"><?php
		/* translators: %s: site title */
		printf( _x( '&larr; Back to %s', 'site' ), get_bloginfo( 'title', 'display' ) );
	?></a></p>
	<?php the_privacy_policy_link( '<div class="privacy-policy-page-link">', '</div>' ); ?>
	<?php endif; ?>

	</div>

	<?php if ( !empty($input_id) ) : ?>
	<script type="text/javascript">
	try{document.getElementById('<?php echo $input_id; ?>').focus();}catch(e){}
	if(typeof wpOnload=='function')wpOnload();
	</script>
	<?php endif; ?>

	<?php
	/**
	 * Fires in the login page footer.
	 *
	 * @since 3.1.0
	 */
	do_action( 'login_footer' ); ?>
	<div class="clear"></div>
	</body>
	</html>
	<?php
}

/**
 * @since 3.0.0
 */
function wp_shake_js() {
?>
<script type="text/javascript">
addLoadEvent = function(func){if(typeof jQuery!="undefined")jQuery(document).ready(func);else if(typeof wpOnload!='function'){wpOnload=func;}else{var oldonload=wpOnload;wpOnload=function(){oldonload();func();}}};
function s(id,pos){g(id).left=pos+'px';}
function g(id){return document.getElementById(id).style;}
function shake(id,a,d){c=a.shift();s(id,c);if(a.length>0){setTimeout(function(){shake(id,a,d);},d);}else{try{g(id).position='static';wp_attempt_focus();}catch(e){}}}
addLoadEvent(function(){ var p=new Array(15,30,15,0,-15,-30,-15,0);p=p.concat(p.concat(p));var i=document.forms[0].id;g(i).position='relative';shake(i,p,20);});
</script>
<?php
}

/**
 * @since 3.7.0
 */
function wp_login_viewport_meta() {
	?>
	<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" />
	<?php
}

/**
 * Handles sending password retrieval email to user.
 *
 * @return bool|WP_Error True: when finish. WP_Error on error
 */
function retrieve_password() {
	$errors = new WP_Error();

	if ( empty( $_POST['user_login'] ) || ! is_string( $_POST['user_login'] ) ) {
		$errors->add('empty_username', __('<strong>ERROR</strong>: Enter a username or email address.'));
	} elseif ( strpos( $_POST['user_login'], '@' ) ) {
		$user_data = get_user_by( 'email', trim( wp_unslash( $_POST['user_login'] ) ) );
		if ( empty( $user_data ) )
			$errors->add('invalid_email', __('<strong>ERROR</strong>: There is no user registered with that email address.'));
	} else {
		$login = trim($_POST['user_login']);
		$user_data = get_user_by('login', $login);
	}

	/**
	 * Fires before errors are returned from a password reset request.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 * @since 4.4.0 Added the `$errors` parameter.
	 *
	 * @param WP_Error $errors A WP_Error object containing any errors generated
	 *                         by using invalid credentials.
	 */
	do_action( 'lostpassword_post', $errors );

	if ( $errors->get_error_code() )
		return $errors;

	if ( !$user_data ) {
		$errors->add('invalidcombo', __('<strong>ERROR</strong>: Invalid username or email.'));
		return $errors;
	}

	// Redefining user_login ensures we return the right case in the email.
	$user_login = $user_data->user_login;
	$user_email = $user_data->user_email;
	$key = get_password_reset_key( $user_data );

	if ( is_wp_error( $key ) ) {
		return $key;
	}

	if ( is_multisite() ) {
		$site_name = get_network()->site_name;
	} else {
		/*
		 * The blogname option is escaped with esc_html on the way into the database
		 * in sanitize_option we want to reverse this for the plain text arena of emails.
		 */
		$site_name = wp_specialchars_decode( get_option( 'blogname' ), ENT_QUOTES );
	}

	$message = __( 'Someone has requested a password reset for the following account:' ) . "\r\n\r\n";
	/* translators: %s: site name */
	$message .= sprintf( __( 'Site Name: %s'), $site_name ) . "\r\n\r\n";
	/* translators: %s: user login */
	$message .= sprintf( __( 'Username: %s'), $user_login ) . "\r\n\r\n";
	$message .= __( 'If this was a mistake, just ignore this email and nothing will happen.' ) . "\r\n\r\n";
	$message .= __( 'To reset your password, visit the following address:' ) . "\r\n\r\n";
	$message .= '<' . network_site_url( "wp-login.php?action=rp&key=$key&login=" . rawurlencode( $user_login ), 'login' ) . ">\r\n";

	/* translators: Password reset email subject. %s: Site name */
	$title = sprintf( __( '[%s] Password Reset' ), $site_name );

	/**
	 * Filters the subject of the password reset email.
	 *
	 * @since 2.8.0
	 * @since 4.4.0 Added the `$user_login` and `$user_data` parameters.
	 *
	 * @param string  $title      Default email title.
	 * @param string  $user_login The username for the user.
	 * @param WP_User $user_data  WP_User object.
	 */
	$title = apply_filters( 'retrieve_password_title', $title, $user_login, $user_data );

	/**
	 * Filters the message body of the password reset mail.
	 *
	 * If the filtered message is empty, the password reset email will not be sent.
	 *
	 * @since 2.8.0
	 * @since 4.1.0 Added `$user_login` and `$user_data` parameters.
	 *
	 * @param string  $message    Default mail message.
	 * @param string  $key        The activation key.
	 * @param string  $user_login The username for the user.
	 * @param WP_User $user_data  WP_User object.
	 */
	$message = apply_filters( 'retrieve_password_message', $message, $key, $user_login, $user_data );

	if ( $message && !wp_mail( $user_email, wp_specialchars_decode( $title ), $message ) )
		wp_die( __('The email could not be sent.') . "<br />\n" . __('Possible reason: your host may have disabled the mail() function.') );

	return true;
}

//
// Main
//

$action = isset($_REQUEST['action']) ? $_REQUEST['action'] : 'login';
$errors = new WP_Error();

if ( isset($_GET['key']) )
	$action = 'resetpass';

// validate action so as to default to the login screen
if ( !in_array( $action, array( 'postpass', 'logout', 'lostpassword', 'retrievepassword', 'resetpass', 'rp', 'register', 'login', 'confirmaction' ), true ) && false === has_filter( 'login_form_' . $action ) )
	$action = 'login';

nocache_headers();

header('Content-Type: '.get_bloginfo('html_type').'; charset='.get_bloginfo('charset'));

if ( defined( 'RELOCATE' ) && RELOCATE ) { // Move flag is set
	if ( isset( $_SERVER['PATH_INFO'] ) && ($_SERVER['PATH_INFO'] != $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) )
		$_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] = str_replace( $_SERVER['PATH_INFO'], '', $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] );

	$url = dirname( set_url_scheme( 'http://' .  $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] ) );
	if ( $url != get_option( 'siteurl' ) )
		update_option( 'siteurl', $url );
}

//Set a cookie now to see if they are supported by the browser.
$secure = ( 'https' === parse_url( wp_login_url(), PHP_URL_SCHEME ) );
setcookie( TEST_COOKIE, 'WP Cookie check', 0, COOKIEPATH, COOKIE_DOMAIN, $secure );
if ( SITECOOKIEPATH != COOKIEPATH )
	setcookie( TEST_COOKIE, 'WP Cookie check', 0, SITECOOKIEPATH, COOKIE_DOMAIN, $secure );

$lang            = ! empty( $_GET['wp_lang'] ) ? sanitize_text_field( $_GET['wp_lang'] ) : '';
$switched_locale = switch_to_locale( $lang );

/**
 * Fires when the login form is initialized.
 *
 * @since 3.2.0
 */
do_action( 'login_init' );

/**
 * Fires before a specified login form action.
 *
 * The dynamic portion of the hook name, `$action`, refers to the action
 * that brought the visitor to the login form. Actions include 'postpass',
 * 'logout', 'lostpassword', etc.
 *
 * @since 2.8.0
 */
do_action( "login_form_{$action}" );

$http_post = ('POST' == $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD']);
$interim_login = isset($_REQUEST['interim-login']);

/**
 * Filters the separator used between login form navigation links.
 *
 * @since 4.9.0
 *
 * @param string $login_link_separator The separator used between login form navigation links.
 */
$login_link_separator = apply_filters( 'login_link_separator', ' | ' );

switch ($action) {

case 'postpass' :
	if ( ! array_key_exists( 'post_password', $_POST ) ) {
		wp_safe_redirect( wp_get_referer() );
		exit();
	}

	require_once ABSPATH . WPINC . '/class-phpass.php';
	$hasher = new PasswordHash( 8, true );

	/**
	 * Filters the life span of the post password cookie.
	 *
	 * By default, the cookie expires 10 days from creation. To turn this
	 * into a session cookie, return 0.
	 *
	 * @since 3.7.0
	 *
	 * @param int $expires The expiry time, as passed to setcookie().
	 */
	$expire = apply_filters( 'post_password_expires', time() + 10 * DAY_IN_SECONDS );
	$referer = wp_get_referer();
	if ( $referer ) {
		$secure = ( 'https' === parse_url( $referer, PHP_URL_SCHEME ) );
	} else {
		$secure = false;
	}
	setcookie( 'wp-postpass_' . COOKIEHASH, $hasher->HashPassword( wp_unslash( $_POST['post_password'] ) ), $expire, COOKIEPATH, COOKIE_DOMAIN, $secure );

	if ( $switched_locale ) {
	    restore_previous_locale();
	}

	wp_safe_redirect( wp_get_referer() );
	exit();

case 'logout' :
	check_admin_referer('log-out');

	$user = wp_get_current_user();

	wp_logout();

	if ( ! empty( $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] ) ) {
		$redirect_to = $requested_redirect_to = $_REQUEST['redirect_to'];
	} else {
		$redirect_to = 'wp-login.php?loggedout=true';
		$requested_redirect_to = '';
	}

	if ( $switched_locale ) {
	    restore_previous_locale();
	}

	/**
	 * Filters the log out redirect URL.
	 *
	 * @since 4.2.0
	 *
	 * @param string  $redirect_to           The redirect destination URL.
	 * @param string  $requested_redirect_to The requested redirect destination URL passed as a parameter.
	 * @param WP_User $user                  The WP_User object for the user that's logging out.
	 */
	$redirect_to = apply_filters( 'logout_redirect', $redirect_to, $requested_redirect_to, $user );
	wp_safe_redirect( $redirect_to );
	exit();

case 'lostpassword' :
case 'retrievepassword' :

	if ( $http_post ) {
		$errors = retrieve_password();
		if ( !is_wp_error($errors) ) {
			$redirect_to = !empty( $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] ) ? $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] : 'wp-login.php?checkemail=confirm';
			wp_safe_redirect( $redirect_to );
			exit();
		}
	}

	if ( isset( $_GET['error'] ) ) {
		if ( 'invalidkey' == $_GET['error'] ) {
			$errors->add( 'invalidkey', __( 'Your password reset link appears to be invalid. Please request a new link below.' ) );
		} elseif ( 'expiredkey' == $_GET['error'] ) {
			$errors->add( 'expiredkey', __( 'Your password reset link has expired. Please request a new link below.' ) );
		}
	}

	$lostpassword_redirect = ! empty( $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] ) ? $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] : '';
	/**
	 * Filters the URL redirected to after submitting the lostpassword/retrievepassword form.
	 *
	 * @since 3.0.0
	 *
	 * @param string $lostpassword_redirect The redirect destination URL.
	 */
	$redirect_to = apply_filters( 'lostpassword_redirect', $lostpassword_redirect );

	/**
	 * Fires before the lost password form.
	 *
	 * @since 1.5.1
	 */
	do_action( 'lost_password' );

	login_header(__('Lost Password'), '<p class="message">' . __('Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.') . '</p>', $errors);

	$user_login = '';

	if ( isset( $_POST['user_login'] ) && is_string( $_POST['user_login'] ) ) {
		$user_login = wp_unslash( $_POST['user_login'] );
	}

?>

<form name="lostpasswordform" id="lostpasswordform" action="<?php echo esc_url( network_site_url( 'wp-login.php?action=lostpassword', 'login_post' ) ); ?>" method="post">
	<p>
		<label for="user_login" ><?php _e( 'Username or Email Address' ); ?><br />
		<input type="text" name="user_login" id="user_login" class="input" value="<?php echo esc_attr($user_login); ?>" size="20" /></label>
	</p>
	<?php
	/**
	 * Fires inside the lostpassword form tags, before the hidden fields.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 */
	do_action( 'lostpassword_form' ); ?>
	<input type="hidden" name="redirect_to" value="<?php echo esc_attr( $redirect_to ); ?>" />
	<p class="submit"><input type="submit" name="wp-submit" id="wp-submit" class="button button-primary button-large" value="<?php esc_attr_e('Get New Password'); ?>" /></p>
</form>

<p id="nav">
<a href="<?php echo esc_url( wp_login_url() ); ?>"><?php _e('Log in') ?></a>
<?php
if ( get_option( 'users_can_register' ) ) :
	$registration_url = sprintf( '<a href="%s">%s</a>', esc_url( wp_registration_url() ), __( 'Register' ) );

	echo esc_html( $login_link_separator );

	/** This filter is documented in wp-includes/general-template.php */
	echo apply_filters( 'register', $registration_url );
endif;
?>
</p>

<?php
login_footer('user_login');

if ( $switched_locale ) {
    restore_previous_locale();
}

break;

case 'resetpass' :
case 'rp' :
	list( $rp_path ) = explode( '?', wp_unslash( $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] ) );
	$rp_cookie = 'wp-resetpass-' . COOKIEHASH;
	if ( isset( $_GET['key'] ) ) {
		$value = sprintf( '%s:%s', wp_unslash( $_GET['login'] ), wp_unslash( $_GET['key'] ) );
		setcookie( $rp_cookie, $value, 0, $rp_path, COOKIE_DOMAIN, is_ssl(), true );
		wp_safe_redirect( remove_query_arg( array( 'key', 'login' ) ) );
		exit;
	}

	if ( isset( $_COOKIE[ $rp_cookie ] ) && 0 < strpos( $_COOKIE[ $rp_cookie ], ':' ) ) {
		list( $rp_login, $rp_key ) = explode( ':', wp_unslash( $_COOKIE[ $rp_cookie ] ), 2 );
		$user = check_password_reset_key( $rp_key, $rp_login );
		if ( isset( $_POST['pass1'] ) && ! hash_equals( $rp_key, $_POST['rp_key'] ) ) {
			$user = false;
		}
	} else {
		$user = false;
	}

	if ( ! $user || is_wp_error( $user ) ) {
		setcookie( $rp_cookie, ' ', time() - YEAR_IN_SECONDS, $rp_path, COOKIE_DOMAIN, is_ssl(), true );
		if ( $user && $user->get_error_code() === 'expired_key' )
			wp_redirect( site_url( 'wp-login.php?action=lostpassword&error=expiredkey' ) );
		else
			wp_redirect( site_url( 'wp-login.php?action=lostpassword&error=invalidkey' ) );
		exit;
	}

	$errors = new WP_Error();

	if ( isset($_POST['pass1']) && $_POST['pass1'] != $_POST['pass2'] )
		$errors->add( 'password_reset_mismatch', __( 'The passwords do not match.' ) );

	/**
	 * Fires before the password reset procedure is validated.
	 *
	 * @since 3.5.0
	 *
	 * @param object           $errors WP Error object.
	 * @param WP_User|WP_Error $user   WP_User object if the login and reset key match. WP_Error object otherwise.
	 */
	do_action( 'validate_password_reset', $errors, $user );

	if ( ( ! $errors->get_error_code() ) && isset( $_POST['pass1'] ) && !empty( $_POST['pass1'] ) ) {
		reset_password($user, $_POST['pass1']);
		setcookie( $rp_cookie, ' ', time() - YEAR_IN_SECONDS, $rp_path, COOKIE_DOMAIN, is_ssl(), true );
		login_header( __( 'Password Reset' ), '<p class="message reset-pass">' . __( 'Your password has been reset.' ) . ' <a href="' . esc_url( wp_login_url() ) . '">' . __( 'Log in' ) . '</a></p>' );
		login_footer();
		exit;
	}

	wp_enqueue_script('utils');
	wp_enqueue_script('user-profile');

	login_header(__('Reset Password'), '<p class="message reset-pass">' . __('Enter your new password below.') . '</p>', $errors );

?>
<form name="resetpassform" id="resetpassform" action="<?php echo esc_url( network_site_url( 'wp-login.php?action=resetpass', 'login_post' ) ); ?>" method="post" autocomplete="off">
	<input type="hidden" id="user_login" value="<?php echo esc_attr( $rp_login ); ?>" autocomplete="off" />

	<div class="user-pass1-wrap">
		<p>
			<label for="pass1"><?php _e( 'New password' ) ?></label>
		</p>

		<div class="wp-pwd">
			<div class="password-input-wrapper">
				<input type="password" data-reveal="1" data-pw="<?php echo esc_attr( wp_generate_password( 16 ) ); ?>" name="pass1" id="pass1" class="input password-input" size="24" value="" autocomplete="off" aria-describedby="pass-strength-result" />
				<span class="button button-secondary wp-hide-pw hide-if-no-js">
					<span class="dashicons dashicons-hidden"></span>
				</span>
			</div>
			<div id="pass-strength-result" class="hide-if-no-js" aria-live="polite"><?php _e( 'Strength indicator' ); ?></div>
		</div>
		<div class="pw-weak">
			<label>
				<input type="checkbox" name="pw_weak" class="pw-checkbox" />
				<?php _e( 'Confirm use of weak password' ); ?>
			</label>
		</div>
	</div>

	<p class="user-pass2-wrap">
		<label for="pass2"><?php _e( 'Confirm new password' ) ?></label><br />
		<input type="password" name="pass2" id="pass2" class="input" size="20" value="" autocomplete="off" />
	</p>

	<p class="description indicator-hint"><?php echo wp_get_password_hint(); ?></p>
	<br class="clear" />

	<?php
	/**
	 * Fires following the 'Strength indicator' meter in the user password reset form.
	 *
	 * @since 3.9.0
	 *
	 * @param WP_User $user User object of the user whose password is being reset.
	 */
	do_action( 'resetpass_form', $user );
	?>
	<input type="hidden" name="rp_key" value="<?php echo esc_attr( $rp_key ); ?>" />
	<p class="submit"><input type="submit" name="wp-submit" id="wp-submit" class="button button-primary button-large" value="<?php esc_attr_e('Reset Password'); ?>" /></p>
</form>

<p id="nav">
<a href="<?php echo esc_url( wp_login_url() ); ?>"><?php _e( 'Log in' ); ?></a>
<?php
if ( get_option( 'users_can_register' ) ) :
	$registration_url = sprintf( '<a href="%s">%s</a>', esc_url( wp_registration_url() ), __( 'Register' ) );

	echo esc_html( $login_link_separator );

	/** This filter is documented in wp-includes/general-template.php */
	echo apply_filters( 'register', $registration_url );
endif;
?>
</p>

<?php
login_footer('user_pass');

if ( $switched_locale ) {
    restore_previous_locale();
}

break;

case 'register' :
	if ( is_multisite() ) {
		/**
		 * Filters the Multisite sign up URL.
		 *
		 * @since 3.0.0
		 *
		 * @param string $sign_up_url The sign up URL.
		 */
		wp_redirect( apply_filters( 'wp_signup_location', network_site_url( 'wp-signup.php' ) ) );
		exit;
	}

	if ( !get_option('users_can_register') ) {
		wp_redirect( site_url('wp-login.php?registration=disabled') );
		exit();
	}

	$user_login = '';
	$user_email = '';

	if ( $http_post ) {
		if ( isset( $_POST['user_login'] ) && is_string( $_POST['user_login'] ) ) {
			$user_login = $_POST['user_login'];
		}

		if ( isset( $_POST['user_email'] ) && is_string( $_POST['user_email'] ) ) {
			$user_email = wp_unslash( $_POST['user_email'] );
		}

		$errors = register_new_user($user_login, $user_email);
		if ( !is_wp_error($errors) ) {
			$redirect_to = !empty( $_POST['redirect_to'] ) ? $_POST['redirect_to'] : 'wp-login.php?checkemail=registered';
			wp_safe_redirect( $redirect_to );
			exit();
		}
	}

	$registration_redirect = ! empty( $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] ) ? $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] : '';
	/**
	 * Filters the registration redirect URL.
	 *
	 * @since 3.0.0
	 *
	 * @param string $registration_redirect The redirect destination URL.
	 */
	$redirect_to = apply_filters( 'registration_redirect', $registration_redirect );
	login_header(__('Registration Form'), '<p class="message register">' . __('Register For This Site') . '</p>', $errors);
?>
<form name="registerform" id="registerform" action="<?php echo esc_url( site_url( 'wp-login.php?action=register', 'login_post' ) ); ?>" method="post" novalidate="novalidate">
	<p>
		<label for="user_login"><?php _e('Username') ?><br />
		<input type="text" name="user_login" id="user_login" class="input" value="<?php echo esc_attr(wp_unslash($user_login)); ?>" size="20" /></label>
	</p>
	<p>
		<label for="user_email"><?php _e('Email') ?><br />
		<input type="email" name="user_email" id="user_email" class="input" value="<?php echo esc_attr( wp_unslash( $user_email ) ); ?>" size="25" /></label>
	</p>
	<?php
	/**
	 * Fires following the 'Email' field in the user registration form.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 */
	do_action( 'register_form' );
	?>
	<p id="reg_passmail"><?php _e( 'Registration confirmation will be emailed to you.' ); ?></p>
	<br class="clear" />
	<input type="hidden" name="redirect_to" value="<?php echo esc_attr( $redirect_to ); ?>" />
	<p class="submit"><input type="submit" name="wp-submit" id="wp-submit" class="button button-primary button-large" value="<?php esc_attr_e('Register'); ?>" /></p>
</form>

<p id="nav">
<a href="<?php echo esc_url( wp_login_url() ); ?>"><?php _e( 'Log in' ); ?></a>
<?php echo esc_html( $login_link_separator ); ?>
<a href="<?php echo esc_url( wp_lostpassword_url() ); ?>"><?php _e( 'Lost your password?' ); ?></a>
</p>

<?php
login_footer('user_login');

if ( $switched_locale ) {
    restore_previous_locale();
}

break;

case 'confirmaction' :
	if ( ! isset( $_GET['request_id'] ) ) {
		wp_die( __( 'Invalid request.' ) );
	}

	$request_id = (int) $_GET['request_id'];

	if ( isset( $_GET['confirm_key'] ) ) {
		$key    = sanitize_text_field( wp_unslash( $_GET['confirm_key'] ) );
		$result = wp_validate_user_request_key( $request_id, $key );
	} else {
		$result = new WP_Error( 'invalid_key', __( 'Invalid key' ) );
	}

	if ( is_wp_error( $result ) ) {
		wp_die( $result );
	}
	
	/**
	 * Fires an action hook when the account action has been confirmed by the user.
	 * 
	 * Using this you can assume the user has agreed to perform the action by
	 * clicking on the link in the confirmation email.
	 * 
	 * After firing this action hook the page will redirect to wp-login a callback
	 * redirects or exits first.
	 *
	 * @param int $request_id Request ID.
	 */
	do_action( 'user_request_action_confirmed', $request_id );

	$message = _wp_privacy_account_request_confirmed_message( $request_id );

	login_header( __( 'User action confirmed.' ), $message );
	login_footer();
	exit;

case 'login' :
default:
	$secure_cookie = '';
	$customize_login = isset( $_REQUEST['customize-login'] );
	if ( $customize_login )
		wp_enqueue_script( 'customize-base' );

	// If the user wants ssl but the session is not ssl, force a secure cookie.
	if ( !empty($_POST['log']) && !force_ssl_admin() ) {
		$user_name = sanitize_user($_POST['log']);
		$user = get_user_by( 'login', $user_name );

		if ( ! $user && strpos( $user_name, '@' ) ) {
			$user = get_user_by( 'email', $user_name );
		}

		if ( $user ) {
			if ( get_user_option('use_ssl', $user->ID) ) {
				$secure_cookie = true;
				force_ssl_admin(true);
			}
		}
	}

	if ( isset( $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] ) ) {
		$redirect_to = $_REQUEST['redirect_to'];
		// Redirect to https if user wants ssl
		if ( $secure_cookie && false !== strpos($redirect_to, 'wp-admin') )
			$redirect_to = preg_replace('|^http://|', 'https://', $redirect_to);
	} else {
		$redirect_to = admin_url();
	}

	$reauth = empty($_REQUEST['reauth']) ? false : true;

	$user = wp_signon( array(), $secure_cookie );

	if ( empty( $_COOKIE[ LOGGED_IN_COOKIE ] ) ) {
		if ( headers_sent() ) {
			/* translators: 1: Browser cookie documentation URL, 2: Support forums URL */
			$user = new WP_Error( 'test_cookie', sprintf( __( '<strong>ERROR</strong>: Cookies are blocked due to unexpected output. For help, please see <a href="%1$s">this documentation</a> or try the <a href="%2$s">support forums</a>.' ),
				__( 'https://codex.wordpress.org/Cookies' ), __( 'https://wordpress.org/support/' ) ) );
		} elseif ( isset( $_POST['testcookie'] ) && empty( $_COOKIE[ TEST_COOKIE ] ) ) {
			// If cookies are disabled we can't log in even with a valid user+pass
			/* translators: 1: Browser cookie documentation URL */
			$user = new WP_Error( 'test_cookie', sprintf( __( '<strong>ERROR</strong>: Cookies are blocked or not supported by your browser. You must <a href="%s">enable cookies</a> to use WordPress.' ),
				__( 'https://codex.wordpress.org/Cookies' ) ) );
		}
	}

	$requested_redirect_to = isset( $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] ) ? $_REQUEST['redirect_to'] : '';
	/**
	 * Filters the login redirect URL.
	 *
	 * @since 3.0.0
	 *
	 * @param string           $redirect_to           The redirect destination URL.
	 * @param string           $requested_redirect_to The requested redirect destination URL passed as a parameter.
	 * @param WP_User|WP_Error $user                  WP_User object if login was successful, WP_Error object otherwise.
	 */
	$redirect_to = apply_filters( 'login_redirect', $redirect_to, $requested_redirect_to, $user );

	if ( !is_wp_error($user) && !$reauth ) {
		if ( $interim_login ) {
			$message = '<p class="message">' . __('You have logged in successfully.') . '</p>';
			$interim_login = 'success';
			login_header( '', $message ); ?>
			</div>
			<?php
			/** This action is documented in wp-login.php */
			do_action( 'login_footer' ); ?>
			<?php if ( $customize_login ) : ?>
				<script type="text/javascript">setTimeout( function(){ new wp.customize.Messenger({ url: '<?php echo wp_customize_url(); ?>', channel: 'login' }).send('login') }, 1000 );</script>
			<?php endif; ?>
			</body></html>
<?php		exit;
		}

		if ( ( empty( $redirect_to ) || $redirect_to == 'wp-admin/' || $redirect_to == admin_url() ) ) {
			// If the user doesn't belong to a blog, send them to user admin. If the user can't edit posts, send them to their profile.
			if ( is_multisite() && !get_active_blog_for_user($user->ID) && !is_super_admin( $user->ID ) )
				$redirect_to = user_admin_url();
			elseif ( is_multisite() && !$user->has_cap('read') )
				$redirect_to = get_dashboard_url( $user->ID );
			elseif ( !$user->has_cap('edit_posts') )
				$redirect_to = $user->has_cap( 'read' ) ? admin_url( 'profile.php' ) : home_url();

			wp_redirect( $redirect_to );
			exit();
		}
		wp_safe_redirect($redirect_to);
		exit();
	}

	$errors = $user;
	// Clear errors if loggedout is set.
	if ( !empty($_GET['loggedout']) || $reauth )
		$errors = new WP_Error();

	if ( $interim_login ) {
		if ( ! $errors->get_error_code() )
			$errors->add( 'expired', __( 'Your session has expired. Please log in to continue where you left off.' ), 'message' );
	} else {
		// Some parts of this script use the main login form to display a message
		if		( isset($_GET['loggedout']) && true == $_GET['loggedout'] )
			$errors->add('loggedout', __('You are now logged out.'), 'message');
		elseif	( isset($_GET['registration']) && 'disabled' == $_GET['registration'] )
			$errors->add('registerdisabled', __('User registration is currently not allowed.'));
		elseif	( isset($_GET['checkemail']) && 'confirm' == $_GET['checkemail'] )
			$errors->add('confirm', __('Check your email for the confirmation link.'), 'message');
		elseif	( isset($_GET['checkemail']) && 'newpass' == $_GET['checkemail'] )
			$errors->add('newpass', __('Check your email for your new password.'), 'message');
		elseif	( isset($_GET['checkemail']) && 'registered' == $_GET['checkemail'] )
			$errors->add('registered', __('Registration complete. Please check your email.'), 'message');
		elseif ( strpos( $redirect_to, 'about.php?updated' ) )
			$errors->add('updated', __( '<strong>You have successfully updated WordPress!</strong> Please log back in to see what&#8217;s new.' ), 'message' );
	}

	/**
	 * Filters the login page errors.
	 *
	 * @since 3.6.0
	 *
	 * @param object $errors      WP Error object.
	 * @param string $redirect_to Redirect destination URL.
	 */
	$errors = apply_filters( 'wp_login_errors', $errors, $redirect_to );

	// Clear any stale cookies.
	if ( $reauth )
		wp_clear_auth_cookie();

	login_header(__('Log In'), '', $errors);

	if ( isset($_POST['log']) )
		$user_login = ( 'incorrect_password' == $errors->get_error_code() || 'empty_password' == $errors->get_error_code() ) ? esc_attr(wp_unslash($_POST['log'])) : '';
	$rememberme = ! empty( $_POST['rememberme'] );

	if ( ! empty( $errors->errors ) ) {
		$aria_describedby_error = ' aria-describedby="login_error"';
	} else {
		$aria_describedby_error = '';
	}
?>

<form name="loginform" id="loginform" action="<?php echo esc_url( site_url( 'wp-login.php', 'login_post' ) ); ?>" method="post">
	<p>
		<label for="user_login"><?php _e( 'Username or Email Address' ); ?><br />
		<input type="text" name="log" id="user_login"<?php echo $aria_describedby_error; ?> class="input" value="<?php echo esc_attr( $user_login ); ?>" size="20" /></label>
	</p>
	<p>
		<label for="user_pass"><?php _e( 'Password' ); ?><br />
		<input type="password" name="pwd" id="user_pass"<?php echo $aria_describedby_error; ?> class="input" value="" size="20" /></label>
	</p>
	<?php
	/**
	 * Fires following the 'Password' field in the login form.
	 *
	 * @since 2.1.0
	 */
	do_action( 'login_form' );
	?>
	<p class="forgetmenot"><label for="rememberme"><input name="rememberme" type="checkbox" id="rememberme" value="forever" <?php checked( $rememberme ); ?> /> <?php esc_html_e( 'Remember Me' ); ?></label></p>
	<p class="submit">
		<input type="submit" name="wp-submit" id="wp-submit" class="button button-primary button-large" value="<?php esc_attr_e('Log In'); ?>" />
<?php	if ( $interim_login ) { ?>
		<input type="hidden" name="interim-login" value="1" />
<?php	} else { ?>
		<input type="hidden" name="redirect_to" value="<?php echo esc_attr($redirect_to); ?>" />
<?php 	} ?>
<?php   if ( $customize_login ) : ?>
		<input type="hidden" name="customize-login" value="1" />
<?php   endif; ?>
		<input type="hidden" name="testcookie" value="1" />
	</p>
</form>

<?php if ( ! $interim_login ) { ?>
<p id="nav">
<?php if ( ! isset( $_GET['checkemail'] ) || ! in_array( $_GET['checkemail'], array( 'confirm', 'newpass' ) ) ) :
	if ( get_option( 'users_can_register' ) ) :
		$registration_url = sprintf( '<a href="%s">%s</a>', esc_url( wp_registration_url() ), __( 'Register' ) );

		/** This filter is documented in wp-includes/general-template.php */
		echo apply_filters( 'register', $registration_url );

		echo esc_html( $login_link_separator );
	endif;
	?>
	<a href="<?php echo esc_url( wp_lostpassword_url() ); ?>"><?php _e( 'Lost your password?' ); ?></a>
<?php endif; ?>
</p>
<?php } ?>

<script type="text/javascript">
function wp_attempt_focus(){
setTimeout( function(){ try{
<?php if ( $user_login ) { ?>
d = document.getElementById('user_pass');
d.value = '';
<?php } else { ?>
d = document.getElementById('user_login');
<?php if ( 'invalid_username' == $errors->get_error_code() ) { ?>
if( d.value != '' )
d.value = '';
<?php
}
}?>
d.focus();
d.select();
} catch(e){}
}, 200);
}

<?php
/**
 * Filters whether to print the call to `wp_attempt_focus()` on the login screen.
 *
 * @since 4.8.0
 *
 * @param bool $print Whether to print the function call. Default true.
 */
if ( apply_filters( 'enable_login_autofocus', true ) && ! $error ) { ?>
wp_attempt_focus();
<?php } ?>
if(typeof wpOnload=='function')wpOnload();
<?php if ( $interim_login ) { ?>
(function(){
try {
	var i, links = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
	for ( i in links ) {
		if ( links[i].href )
			links[i].target = '_blank';
	}
} catch(e){}
}());
<?php } ?>
</script>

<?php
login_footer();

if ( $switched_locale ) {
    restore_previous_locale();
}

break;
} // end action switch
FAQ - Red Rock Medical Group FAQ - Red Rock Medical Group
Dropdown button for navigation mobile view
(702) 877-9514

5701 W. Charleston Blvd, #100
Las Vegas, Nevada 89146

FAQ

Top Signs of Type II Diabetes

In the United States, more than 25 million people suffer from type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes means these individuals do not properly utilize insulin, which results in their blood glucose levels being at an unhealthy high level. However, most people suffering from this disease are completely unaware because the main symptoms seem much more like annoyances than complications. The following information explains a few of the top signs of type 2 diabetes.

Itchy, Dry Skin
People with diabetes in Las Vegas may also experience itchy, dry skin. As previously mentioned, diabetes decreases the circulation of the blood, which causes sweat glands to malfunction. The end result is flaky, dehydrated, irritated, and itchy skin. This is commonly the initial sign and indication of diabetes.

Numbness
One of the top warning signs of diabetes is numbness in the fingers, legs, feet and hands. It always starts out as a minor, tingling, prickly pain in the beginning. The numbness is the result of a spike in blood sugar levels, which causes the restriction of blood vessels. This restriction causes damage to nerve fibers. Over time, the damage progresses, and the minor tingling turns into chronic and painful symptoms.

Blurry Vision
Blurred vision is one of the top signs of type 2 diabetes. When the glucose levels spike, it restricts the blood flow to the eyes. Over time, this can lead to vision loss if the patient isn’t treated. At the same time, people with diabetes have a significantly higher likelihood of developing glaucoma.

Weight Loss
Unexplained and fast weight loss is another symptom of diabetes. The weight loss is caused by the body’s inability to properly absorb glucose. Anytime the body is not able to get enough insulin, it turns to the muscles and fat as its energy source, which reduces the overall body weight. As a result of the weight loss, the individual may have an increased appetite without any weight gain. When this happens, the body is in a diabetic state. Anytime someone losses 5 to 10 pounds without any reason, it’s vital to speak to their physician immediately for a blood test.

Increased Urination
In most cases of diabetes, the individual has a major urge to urinate all the time, which causes dehydration. When the body gets dehydrated, the ability of the immune system to perform is hampered, which opens the door to damaged kidney function and several other illnesses. This is why it’s important for diabetics to keep high fluid levels.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 

Multifaceted Levels of Pain Management Shown to be Effective in the Long Term

Patients who suffer from chronic pain and visit a clinic for pain management and/or therapy are searching for a way to ease their daily suffering. However many don’t realize that pain management goes beyond the scheduled visit and taking the prescription. Pain management that addresses multiple aspects is found to be more effective in both the long and short term according to research done by the American Pain Foundation when it was still operating.

More Patient Control is Both Psychologically and Physically Rewarding
The one thing that most people who suffer from chronic pain agree on is that they feel like they are out of control of many aspects of their own body and life. After all, the pain can come on unexpectedly often without an obvious cause and disrupt plans. When a patient comes in for quality care at a clinic the treatments are often effective, but when they walk away the patient is left with little more than pain pills to help them manage until the next appointment. Knowledge and even equipment to assist a chronic pain sufferer between visits can put a sense on control back into their life.

At Home Treatment Options are as Veritable as Types of Pain
Traction equipment is often a go-to for clinics to help set injuries and ease chronic pain. This equipment is available for the home and when used properly can ease many types of recurring pain including back and neck pain.
Yoga Meditation and yoga techniques are great for calming the mind, even through a flare up. Yoga has been indicated to reduce flare ups as well through gentle strength training. It may feel awkward at first, but those who learn the methods effectively see positive results.
Hot/Cold Therapy Athletes instantly soak their injuries in hot and cold water, this technique can work well for chronic pain as well. From hot tubs, to simple compresses this treatment can be instant and effective and can be used every day.
There are other more complex methods as well to allow a persistent patient to find at home relief outside of pain pills.
For those looking for pain management in Las Vegas, mental tools and physical devices to fight against the pain even without the assistance of professionals can help reduce some of the anxiety that arises over fear of the next flare up. Chronic pain flare ups can contribute to depression and learning to cope with the pain independently can reduce pain associated depression.

pain management las vegas

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Why Consider a Family Practice Clinic?

Not that long ago, people might always expect the same doctor to deliver babies, administer children’s vaccines, and prescribe antibiotics to mom and dad when they have a sinus infection. These days, medicine has become a lot more specialized. It’s really common for different family members to see different doctors. In fact, some family members might even see different doctors for different issues. Some parents might think that they have to keep track of pediatricians, gynecologists, and many more kinds of doctors just to get routine health care.

Why Consider a Family Practice?

However, it might be time to consider clinics that offer family practice in Las Vegas. These trained specialists have the ability to see a variety of patients and treat a wide range of health issues. A greater emphasis on holistic health has made this choice more popular lately.

For example, knowing that a parent has a certain allergy could make it easier to diagnose that health issue in a child. If one parent is diabetic, doctor’s may be more cautions about monitoring children and advising parents about proper nutrition.

Also, it’s convenient to only remember one clinic when it’s time to make an appointment for a checkup, illness, or injury. Working out insurance and billing can take a lot of time, so it’s much easier to keep everything with one office.

What is a Family Practice Doctor?

Some people don’t realize that family practice is a specialty area of medicine. Typically, these doctors have to complete a three-year residency after they graduate from medical school. It’s just that these doctors specialize in treating a variety of common ailments and not in very specific disciplines. Their clinical rotations include a variety of specialties that help them treat young children, teenagers, men, women, and seniors.

In some cases, a family practice doctor might not be able to diagnose or treat a certain ailment. At that point, they might refer a patient to another specialist. But for many relatively healthy children and adults, a family practice doctor is really all that they need. Very often, they can provide the right health care and develop a good relationship with everybody in the family.

family practice las vegas

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Foods and Other Unknown Allergens May Trigger Asthma Attacks

An internal medicine doctor is able to create a plan for an asthma patient to prevent asthma attacks. For some people, this still isn’t enough, and symptoms may continue to arise. There might be a good reason for that. Sometimes, the culprit is an unknown suspect that may be something a person is using on a regular basis.

The spices a person cooks with may be triggering an inflammatory response. Ones like coriander, pepper, cumin, paprika, dill, saffron and poppy seeds have the potential to cause an asthma attack because they can cause swelling in the bronchioles to swell.

Asthmatics should even be leery of what paint they use on their walls. Although the worst of the problem is during the painting process, the walls still emit gases even after they’re completely dry. An oil-based paint gives off fumes, and the chemicals it exudes will possibly trigger an asthma attack. A person with asthma should opt for a latex paint. These paints release less chemicals, which reduces a person’s chances of having breathing difficulty from it. When selecting a paint, a person should check for a green seal certification mark on the can to indicate the paint gives off less gas and compounds.

Citrus fruits are supposed to be good for an individual’s health; however, for asthmatics, they can be more problematic. Lemon and limes contain plenty of vitamins like vitamin C, but they also consist of a compound known as limonene. Limonene sets off an allergic reaction in some people. In some cases, the allergic reaction may even damage the lungs. This is especially dangerous since a person with the condition already has problems with his or her lungs.

The soap a person uses has the potential to cause an allergic response, and not just the typical fragrant body washes. Antibacterial soap contains a synthetic pesticide referred to as triclosan. It’s best to refrain from antibacterial soaps and use a standard soap. It’s just as effective as the ones that claim to kill 99.9 percent of all germs.

A great deal can affect a person’s condition. It’s best to discuss with an internal medicine physician to eliminate potential causes of an asthma attack. This include all of the items mentioned above in addition to the usual suspects like pollen, dust and mold.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
4 Awesome Benefits of Donating Blood
Although a bite from a radioactive spider may not make someone into a super hero, a tiny prick from a needle can save lives. It’s simple, anytime someone donates blood, they transform into a real life-saving hero. In addition to giving the gift of life, donating blood also offers several benefits to the individual donating the blood. Continue reading to learn more about the amazing benefits of donating blood.
Free Health Check Up
Anytime someone donates blood they will automatically receive a free health checkup. Every blood donation must undergo strenuous tests to ensure the blood is healthy. As a safety precaution before every blood donation, several health checks are performed on the donor to ensure they are healthy. One of the checkups they perform are tests for blood pressure abnormalities, which may detect an indolent disease at the early stage. After the blood has been donated, the blood products and blood are tested for several different infections. If any abnormality is detected in those tests, the individual can choose to be informed. Simply put, regular blood donations are an excellent and cost effective way to have blood work in Las Vegas.
Saves Lives
Since there are no perfect substitutes for human blood, donating blood literally saves lives. Once someone donates blood, it’s then divided into several components based on the individual needs of the patient. Each part of the blood can be utilized by different patients for different reasons. Most newborn babies benefit from a single done because their blood requirements are significantly less. In any case, each blood donation can be used for up to four patients. Simply put, donating blood is the best way to save lives.
Reduce Cancer Risk
There’s a strong connection between cancer and high levels of iron. Anytime someone donates blood, the amount of iron in their body is reduced, which would theoretically reduce the likelihood of cancer in regular donors.
Get Rid of Calories
In addition to saving lives, donating blood can help the donor lose weight. Every blood donation can help a patient lose up to 650 calories. However, donating blood isn’t and shouldn’t be used as a way to lose weight. To be safe, blood should only be donated once every three months. The amount of blood the individual can donate will vary based on their iron levels, their health status, and their hemoglobin levels.
blood work las vegas

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Post Menopausal Women Can Seek the Help of an Endocrinologist in Las Vegas For Bone-Related Issues
Endocrinology deals with illnesses related to hormones. A subfield of internal medicine, it is a wide field encompassing issues related to metabolism, reproduction and movement. The field focuses on the endocrine glands, which release hormones into the bloodstream. A visit to an office of endocrinology in Las Vegas is a starting point for post menopausal women who might be suffering from issues related to weakened bones.

Menopause and Bone Loss
Estrogen helps protect the bone forming and absorbing cells in the body. But, when women reach the menopausal stage in their lives, their estrogen levels often decreases sharply. These women are thus at risk for bone loss, which can lead to osteoporosis. People with osteoporosis develop weak bones, which might break with the minutest activity–such as sneezing.

Bone Density Test
Doctors review the results of bone density tests to get an idea of their patient’s bone health. Such tests measure the mineral density in the bones. After the test, the person receives a Z-score and a T-score. The Z-score compares the person’s bone density to that of a normal healthy person of the same age, while the T-Score measures bone density of people over 50.

If a person has a standard deviation of 1, then he or she is within the normal range, but if a person’s deviation is 2.5 or more below the norm, that person might have osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis and Exercise
Menopausal women might find an exercise program aimed at people with osteoporosis helpful. Such programs focus on strengthening bones and muscles, and improving balance and coordination. In this way, falls and bone fractures are avoided. Exercises that are helpful include walking and weight lifting exercises. Workouts that involves balancing and proper posture increase muscle strength, so they’re also useful for preventing falls.

Medications
If a post menopausal woman visits an office of endocrinology in Las Vegas, her endocrinologist might prescribe certain medications to help her if she needs osteoporosis treatment. Common medications include Alendronate, Risedronate, Ibandronate and Zoledronic acid. These drugs help to slow the process that causes women to lose bone density.

Growth Hormones
Doctors also use growth hormones to treat hormone deficiencies in adults. Growth hormones are peptides that stimulate growth and regeneration. For example, a recent endocrinology study showed that growth hormones were successful in helping postmenopausal women improve bone density and reduce the risks of bone fractures.

endocrinology las vegas

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Dealing With Insomnia

The inability to sleep well at night can be devastating and disruptive to daily life. Without a good night’s sleep, it can be extremely hard to concentrate and function during the regular work or school day. Research and study focusing on the reasons behind insomnia has resulted in tips to improve sleeping patterns. For people who have trouble sleeping, one of the first suggestions they might receive from their family practitioner is to keep a sleep journal for one to two weeks. The sleep diary will track such things as the amount of sleep a person gets, the quality of sleep and how that person functions during the day. There is a sleep center in Las Vegas that specializes in overcoming insomnia and improving sleep habits.
Practicing Good Sleep Habits
While some people may sleep “like a baby” from the minute their head hits the pillow, others toss and turn all night in an effort to sleep. Before going to bed, people with trouble sleeping should take time to relax. This can mean different things to different people, but suggestions include listening to relaxing music, reading a book that isn’t too dramatic or taking a warm bubble bath. Also, going to sleep at precisely the same hour every night and getting up at the same time every morning is helpful. Sticking to the same schedule is a good tip that helps form good sleep habits.
Watching the Clock
Many people go to bed and begin to worry about everything that needs to be done. A good way of relieving worry is by making lists that can be taken care of the following day. Once the tasks are written on a to-do list, it can be easier to sleep. Another bad habit is staring at the clock and checking the time.
Modifying Daily Schedules
A sleep center in Las Vegas encourages clients to rearrange their daily schedule in order to be able to improve sleep at night. While exercising during the day is great, it must be done at least four hours before going to bed. The sleep center also recommends avoiding all types of stimulants late in the day as they can make it difficult to get to sleep at night. Stimulants include alcohol, nicotine, sweets and caffeine. In addition, heavy meals before bedtime can make sleep difficult, although a light snack can be helpful.
sleep center Las Vegas

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Minimizing Effects of Cold and Flu Season on Children
Cold and flu season is here, which means that everyone has a higher likelihood of getting a sniffle, cough or worse. Children can become very sick from these common viruses. Proper precautions and medical care helps to ensure that these viruses do not linger or cause more serious problems for families.
Proper Hand Washing
The most effective way to prevent the spread of viruses during the cold months is hand washing. While some people believe that using antibacterial hand gel is more effective, many experts argue that it is not. Viruses cause colds and influenza, not bacteria. Children can be taught from a very young age how to wash their hands carefully and thoroughly. They should scrub their hands with soap for at least 15-20 seconds, making sure to scrub on top, between fingers and underneath long fingernails. Regularly washing hands before eating, after coming into contact with others who may be sick and after using the restroom is a good practice for children to learn.
Precautions at School and Day Care
Children who attend school or day care can bring home germs that cause colds, flu and other conditions. Parents can help minimize the effects of these diseases by teaching children to cough into their elbows and wash their hands after blowing their noses. Schools and day care centers usually have rules against bringing children who are sick. These diseases spread quickly around children who may share toys, equipment, food and drink. As a general rule, it is better to keep a sick child at home if at all possible, even if the problem is minor.
Medical Care
Doctors recommend that all people get a flu vaccine as soon as they are available in the fall. Infants as young as six months may safely receive the vaccine. The virus changes from year to year, so inoculation each year is important to ensure more effective immunity. Since the vaccine does not prevent the cold and some rarer strains of influenza, experts caution parents to continue to keep a close eye on their children’s health during cold and flu season. If a child has a high fever, is extremely lethargic or has a cold that does not seem to go away, it is best to seek medical attention as soon as possible.
Getting the cold or flu is no fun, but it happens often at this time of year. With an eye for prevention and pediatric services in Las Vegas, parents help their children to stay healthy all year round.
keywords: pediatric Las Vegas

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Pulmonary Function Tests and COPD

When it comes to leading causes of U.S. deaths, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occupies third place.  It is also a major cause of disability and has no cure.  Physicians rely on pulmonary function tests to make a diagnosis of COPD.  They also use these tests to monitor how the disorder progresses during future patient visits.

Overview of COPD

This lung disease is linked to an unusual inflammatory response and obstructed airflow, particularly when a patient exhales.  It typically occurs in individuals who are at least 35 years old.

The most common signs of COPD are breathing difficulty, coughing, wheezing, and producing sputum.  The causes of airway obstruction are chronic bronchitis and emphysema.  Tests to determine a diagnosis of COPD are available from a specialist in pulmonology in Las Vegas.

Experts estimate that smoking cigarettes is the cause of approximately 80 percent of COPD cases.  Other potential culprits are certain genetic deficiencies and exposure to pollutants such as fumes and dust.  Treatments include medications, oxygen therapy, lifestyle changes, pulmonary rehabilitation, and surgery.

Pulmonary Function Tests

The primary method doctors use to diagnose COPD and monitor a patient’s condition is the use of pulmonary function tests.  The standard test upon which most physicians rely is spirometry.

This test measures both the volume and the force of air as an individual exhales.  It is particularly helpful in identifying early-stage COPD.  It is also useful for screening smokers or individuals with a family history of specific genetic deficiencies.

Spirometry has standardized results, which makes it easy to compare successive tests to see how the patient is responding to treatment.  Specialists consider it painless, reliable, and effective.

During this test, the patient remains seated and inhales and exhales with force into a mouthpiece.  The test then calibrates the force of the air.  Doctors determine two values:

Other tools to diagnose and monitor COPD include:

pulmonolgy Las Vegas

Translate »